BAR THEFT.com
How Bartenders Steal & How We Catch Them - Hospitality Checkpoint is a Bar Theft & Service Staff Evaluation Company. We spot Bartender Theft & Evaluate Service Staff Standards.
Home

Bartender Theft Detection Agent (Chicago, Los Angeles, New Your City, Dallas, Phoenix)

March 5, 2015 18:16 by administrator

Bartender Theft Detection Agent
HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT LLC


• Do you have bartending experience
• Server or bar/restaurant manager experience
• Comfortable playing a role
• Non-judgmental observer
• Fair and objective
• Excellent communicator with fluid writing skills
• Good memory for details
• Reliable meeting deadlines
• Follows specific direction
• Thorough and accurate with detailed paperwork
• Computer literate with Word, Excel, e-mail and attachments

 

Hospitality Checkpoint is a bartender theft detection spotter service company specializing in bartender theft detection and deterrents for the hospitality industry. Hospitality Checkpoint spots for bartender theft and evaluates service staff standards. We have performed integrity reports for restaurants, bars, clubs, and resorts throughout the country. Hospitality Checkpoint is in touch with the trends and norms of the vibrant dining, bar and hospitality industry. We expect quality reports and compensate accordingly. Good writing skills are a must at Hospitality Checkpoint.

Hospitality Checkpoint Agents are very carefully selected and chosen for the unique skills necessary to evaluate at the level expected. Meticulous screening and training are the norm, and they are professionals who understand the importance of integrity and what proper customer service means to the success of a bar or restaurant. Moreover, all of our agents must possess knowledge and years of experience in restaurants, bars, nightclubs, and resorts customer service industries in order to properly evaluate for theft and service concerns.

Please take a moment to view sample reports at our Hospitality Checkpoint BARTENDER SPOTTER SERVICES website www.HospitalityCheckpoint.com and see if you have what it takes to be a Hospitality Checkpoint Bar Spotter Service Agent. These are part time contracted positions and you can apply on-line at the website hyperlink APPLY NOW . Our Bartender Theft Blog can be viewed at: BARTHEFT.com Please follow the on-line process described -- No inquiry telephone calls please.


Ariz. to lead nation in restaurant growth

February 17, 2015 19:20 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

http://www.hospitalitycheckpoint.com/

Will Sowards, Cronkite News

A new report from the National Restaurant Association predicts Arizona's restaurant industry will lead the rest of the country in growth this year and will continue to do so for at least the next 10 years.

The report ranked Arizona first in the nation for anticipated restaurant sales growth in 2015 and first in job growth through 2025.

The report used economic indicators like total employment in the restaurant industry, disposable personal income and population to estimate new jobs and sales in the coming years.

This is the second consecutive year the group has projected Arizona would lead the nation in sales growth.

"If we go back to last year, we can tell Arizona is doing something right," said Chianne Hewer, spokeswoman for the Arizona Restaurant Association. "Our restaurants have seen growth in the flexibility in new culinary concepts and talent."

Hewer said major events during the state's cooler months play an important role in Arizona's growth. She noted that annual events like spring training and the Waste Management Phoenix Open attract hundreds of thousands of people, and special larger events, like the Super Bowl, put some restaurants in the spotlight.

Andrew Fritz, who owns some Valley restaurants, said the Super Bowl definitely has an impact.

"A lot of people think that if you miss the Super Bowl, then you are missing out on a significant opportunity to generate revenue," Fritz said. "Overall, I think this time of year in Arizona is extremely strong. March and spring training is our biggest opportunity to generate revenue, and we are forecasting to see that again regardless of having the Super Bowl here."

Fritz said Arizona's growth isn't a total surprise.

With a favorable environment for opening a business, like fewer labor restrictions and lower taxes, he said the state makes it easy to open a restaurant.

"I like Arizona," Fritz said. "I like the economic climate here. I know I can open up the door 365 days a year. It gets really hot in the summer, but it is predictable."

Fritz and his partners at Phoenix-based In Good Spirits opened their first restaurant, Citizen Public House, in 2011, and started their second concept, The Gladly, in 2013.

"The recession provided a unique kind of phenomenon where people felt more comfortable spending their money in restaurants," he said. "Restaurants tended to be the first to come out of the recession. For a family of four, it's a lot cheaper to go out to dinner and have an entertaining, engaging family experience centered around food than, say, go to a baseball game or a basketball game."

As the economy continues to improve, the National Restaurant Association estimated that Arizona would add as many as 65,000 new food-services jobs.

However, succeeding in the competitive industry is difficult even when it's growing, Hewer said.

"As rewarding and amazing as the restaurant industry is, it is hard work," Hewer said. "It is not a 9-to-5 job and is very labor intensive."

By the Numbers

The National Restaurant Association's 2015 Restaurant Industry Forecast included several estimates for the industry. It ranked Arizona as first in the nation for sales growth in 2015, followed by Florida, North Dakota, North Dakota and Texas. Other estimates for Arizona included:

           Sales growth for 2015: 4.9 percent

           Employment growth for 2015: 3 percent (third in nation)

           Employment growth through 2025: 23.8 percent (first in nation)

           Revenue for 2015: $11.5 billion (first in Mountain region)

Source: National Restaurant Association, 2015 Restaurant Industry Forecast

 


How The Boss May Be Quietly Pocketing Your Server's Tips

February 17, 2015 18:46 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

http://www.hospitalitycheckpoint.com/

How The Boss May Be Quietly Pocketing Your Server's Tips

By Dave Jamieson

Laurie Zabawa says she'd been working at a Hilton Garden Inn in Bozeman, Montana, for seven years when the owners outsourced the management of the hotel in 2012. For Zabawa, the hotel's banquet manager, this meant that any parties that took place in the hotel would now be overseen by an outside firm, an Ohio-based company called Gateway Hospitality Group.

The banquet workers whom Zabawa oversaw weren't being let go, so the service-industry lifer says she took the change in stride -- that is, until Gateway explained the new policy on gratuities.

By tradition, when clients of the hotel ran up banquet tabs, they'd be subject to an automatic gratuity of 18 to 20 percent. That money was then distributed among the waiters, bartenders and other food workers who handled the event, according to Zabawa. For workers earning close to minimum wage, these tips could equal half their base pay, and they were essential to making a living.

But according to Zabawa and a lawsuit she's filed in Montana state court, after Gateway took over, the automatic gratuity was renamed a "service" or "setup" fee, and the house stopped distributing that money to staff. Zabawa claims that workers were told to sign papers accepting a new flat wage that didn't include gratuities. Most workers were given a nominal raise of about $1 per hour, but it didn't come close to making up for the lost tips, she says.

As banquet manager, Zabawa says she was tasked with implementing the new policy.

"It was awful," Zabawa, 50, told The Huffington Post. "Just imagine working there with those people for years. They were my family. It was horrible to go through, and I had no options."

Zabawa claims she was pressured to quit her job after telling management she believed the new policy violated Montana wage laws. She is suing over what she deems wrongful termination, and she's asked the court to declare the hotel's use of service fees illegal.

Hilton and the hotel's operator, Bozeman Lodging Investors, did not respond to requests for comment about Zabawa's allegations. Bob Voelker, Gateway's CEO and a Hilton veteran, told HuffPost he would not comment on ongoing litigation. According to the company's website, Gateway has contracts with at least 17 Hilton-brand properties in four states.

In the service industry, it's become fairly common for the house to present customers with a charge that's implied to be a tip for the workers -- only to turn around and keep that money for itself. Such add-on costs often come in the guise of a "service" fee, and the charge tends to match what most of us would associate with a typical gratuity.

For businesses, these fees often function as a surreptitious price increase, allowing them to charge customers more while maintaining the same base price. Though these fees don't go to workers, people like Zabawa believe their presence makes customers assume that the bartenders, servers and others who rely on tips have somehow been covered.

"I had employees who quit," Zabawa said. "They just weren't willing to work there anymore."

Zabawa's employees weren't the only workers feeling burned by such fees. In 2010, catering employees who worked the U.S. Open at Arthur Ashe Stadium in New York sued the concessions company there for allegedly pocketing a 21 percent service fee that was tacked onto customers' bills. The workers, who also claimed they were shorted on overtime pay, argued that the service fee was portrayed as a gratuity. The class-action lawsuit was settled in 2013 for $600,000.

As HuffPost reported in 2011, beer and hot dog vendors at New York's Yankee Stadium claimed they were victims of a similar scheme. The stadium's concessionaire, Legends Hospitality, was attaching a 20 percent service fee to the drink and food orders in the stadium's luxury boxes, but the vendors who sold those orders were only taking in 4 to 6 percent in commission. According to a lawsuit filed by the vendors, the remainder of that 20 percent fee was going to Legends, which, at the time, was jointly owned by the New York Yankees, the Dallas Cowboys and the investment bank Goldman Sachs. (After it was sued, Legends made clear on its menus that only a small portion of the fee went to servers.)

The practice has even made its way into the pizza delivery business. As HuffPost reported last year, Pizza Hut, Papa John's and Domino's now commonly tack nominal "delivery fees" onto the tabs of delivery orders. Those fees, which are usually between $1.50 and $3 a pop, do not go to the drivers, even though many customers forego a driver tip believing that they do. Many career drivers told HuffPost they believe the practice has helped depress wages in their field.

One former catering worker at the U.S. Open said the use of service fees not only hurts workers' paychecks, but also creates confusion and tension among clients.

"In this industry, it happens a lot. A client will have the assumption that the service fee is indicative of some type of gratuity going to the employee," said the worker, who asked to remain anonymous due to the litigation. "They're feeling that they're already being forced to pay a tip. A strange sort of animosity can build up between the client and the server."

Several states have recognized the problems stemming from service fees and tried to address them in their own ways, with laws now on the books in Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York and Washington state.

In Hawaii, any hotel or restaurant that tacks on a service fee is required to distribute that fee in full to employees. A similar statute in Massachusetts applies the same rule to the service industry at large, while also barring management from sharing in employee tip pools. In Washington state, service fees may be used, but receipts must show clearly how much of the fee goes to employees.

Recently, the hotel workers' union Unite Here has worked to insert language into local wage laws to ensure that service fees stay with workers. According to the minimum wage ordinance passed last year in Los Angeles, which established a $15 wage floor for large hotels in the city, any such fee belongs to the workforce, regardless of what management chooses to call it -- be it a "service charge," a "delivery charge" or a "porterage" fee, to name a few examples.

The Montana law, which would cover Zabawa's hotel, defines a service fee as "an arbitrary fixed charge added to the customer's bill by an employer in lieu of a tip." According to state code, such a fee "must be distributed directly to the nonmanagement employee preparing or serving the food or beverage or to any other employee involved in related services."

"Defendants admit they do not provide the 20% arbitrary fee to the nonmanagement staff members," Zabawa's lawyer, Jason Armstrong, wrote in a court filing, referring to Gateway and Bozeman Lodging Investors. "The question then becomes one of law; is the policy legal or not under the law?"

According to Zabawa, the hotel lost many of its servers under the new gratuity policy, since for them it effectively translated to a pay cut. Zabawa said she was simply instructed to hire new employees.

After workers lost their tips, one of the servers brought the language of the Montana statute to Zabawa, she claims in her lawsuit. Zabawa, in turn, took the server's concerns to a manager for Gateway. Zabawa alleges in her suit that she was then instructed to "write up" the "problem employee" and fire her. Zabawa says she refused.

Zabawa says she then lost her position as banquet manager and was switched to a sales job. In her lawsuit, she argues that leaving "was the only reasonable alternative" at that point. Under Montana law, such a voluntary termination could still be considered wrongful discharge if the employer created an intolerable situation.

After eight years at the hotel, Zabawa wound up working part-time at Pier 1 Imports before finding a new job in banquet work. Her income has taken a sharp drop, she says, but that's something she's managed to live with.

"I go to sleep at night knowing that I'm not apologizing [to my employees] and that I'm not sorry every day," she said.

 

 


Resort Lobby Bar

January 9, 2015 03:06 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

http://www.hospitalitycheckpoint.com/

BARTENDER THEFT:                                                                                                                                                                  

Bartender Summary                                                                                                                                 

·        Bartender 1- Xxxxx; Caucasian female, slim build, blond hair worn back, wearing a light blue uniform button down top.

·        Bartender 2- Xxxxx; Caucasian female, medium build, blond and brown hair worn back, wearing a light blue uniform button down top.

·        Bartender 3- Xxxxx; Caucasian female, slim build, short blond and brown hair, wearing a light blue uniform button down top.

She asked the Agent if they were ready to place their order and the Agent placed one with her.

She did not make any suggestions or mention any menu items by name.

The Agent asked her opinion about some of the menu items but she seemed to be quite picky saying that she had not tried many items since she did not like them.

The Agent’s food was delivered by Theron and Xxxxx did not check back for quite some time. The Agent informed Theron of an issue with their food which he fixed promptly. Xxxxx did not even seem to notice or say anything about the issue.

She seemed to be very overwhelmed and not to be smiling or very friendly.

She did not give the Agent any silverware and they had to flag her down to ask for some.  She appeared to forget and the Agent had to flag her down and ask again.

She took a short while to come clear once the Agent was done and she did not offer refills for a very long time despite the Agent’s glass being empty.

She did not offer dessert and came to offer the Agent the bill a very long time after they were done eating and drinking.

Once the bill was served payment was processed quickly.

The Agent would like to note that they were only charged for 2 of the 3 drinks they had ordered.

Xxxxx was observed to be pouring a 5 count White Russian with a 3 count of vanilla vodka and a 2 count of Kahlua.

On one occasion the Agent overheard a patron asking Xxxxx if their drink was a double. She said she had made the drink a double and put an extra shot in the extra blended drink portion. She told the patron that their drink in fact had 3 shots in it and he seemed happy.

Xxxxx was observed to be texting on her phone behind the bar.

Xxxxx was observed to be bringing glassware to the bar and holding the glasses with her fingers in the cup.

She was observed to be doing dishes.

On one occasion she was observed to be pouring a 3 count.

Xxxxx was observed to be doing dishes.

All of the bartenders were observed to be using an ice scoop.

The Agent observed Xxxxx to be working alone behind the bar for the majority of their stay and they wonder if Xxxxx and Xxxxx were actually servers.

A receipt was not observed to be placed in front of bar patrons after each round.

The Agent did not observe any patrons being ID’d.

The Agent observed multiple patrons to be ordering drinks and taking them away from the bar.

The Agent did not observe any children consuming alcohol but it would have been very easy for a patron to buy a minor a drink and give it to them outside of the bar..

Michael Zenner - CEO      

Hospitality Checkpoint LLC

hospitalitycheckpoint.com

bartheft.com  (blog)

liquorassessment.com

PO BOX 995 Gilbert AZ 85299

Office: 480-777-1919

Toll Free: 800-880-0811

© Hospitality Checkpoint LLC 2015

 


Delayed drink rings

January 9, 2015 02:56 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

BARTENDER THEFT:

Bartender Summary            

  • Bartender – “Xxxxxx” on receipt, female, late 20’s, slender, highlighted blond hair pulled back and up wearing a turquoise logo tank top and denim shorts.

   The agent took a seat at the bar and was greeted promptly by the  

   bartender who placed down menus and cocktail napkins while

   asking “do you know what you’re drinking”? The agent asked a few questions and placed a beverage order. She seemed personable and friendly; however, she did not introduce herself by name or ask the agents name to associate a tab within the POS.

The beverage order was prepared right away and served. She did not

   immediately move to the POS. The agent also observed throughout

   the evaluation that drink orders were not rang up immediately and

   at times up to 15 minutes later and in a group fashion therefore the

   agent is not able to tell if all patron’s drinks were accounted for.

   The agents tab was itemized and correct.

She checked back several minutes later and asked if the agent was hungry at all; although, she did not make any suggestions or recommendations and left the menu on the bar the entire visit.

During the evaluation the bartender checked back often and when appropriate offered additional drinks. She seemed to be aware of drink levels for all patrons at the bar and was attentive and friendly with the regulars.

As far as drink preparation goes, she was observed using an ice scoop to fill glasses with ice, glassware used was clean, beer glasses were rotated and kept cold, wine glasses were polished and spot free and empty glasses were cleared from the bar in a timely manner.

The agent observed several mixed drinks prepared at the bar. All were at a minimum of a five count pour which is heavier than the allotted amount. The agent observed an 8 count Jack Daniels honey for the service well; however, the agent is not able to tell  whether or not it was supposed to be a double. She filled the glass with a 7 count pour and topped it off with a clearer colored mixer  from the soda gun and then poured another 1+ count on top.

On another couple of occasions the agent was able to observe the bartender pour a mixed drink that did not have a pour spout. The drink was prepared in a tall glass filled with ice with the amount of liquor filling the glass about two thirds of the way full. It was obviously far more than the standard 4 count measure. The agent recommends that all bottles be fitted with a pour spout and that the bar staff adhere to the standard 4 count measure outlined by the company to ensure consistent drinks and maintain cost controls.

Wine was poured in an eyeball fashion of measurement. The agent recommends using the carafe for measurement every time also for consistency and maintaining cost controls.

The agent made a few other observations such as the bartender drinking beer, making change out of the tip jar, texting on her phone, drinking from an open glass, and eating soup.

The MOD and the bartender were observed drinking draft beer from small rocks glasses behind the bar. While it appeared that this was a “sampling” it is certainly a violation of the Arizona liquor laws.

TITLE 4, CHAPTER 3

4-244. Unlawful acts

12. For a licensee, when engaged in waiting on or serving customers, to consume spirituous liquor or for a licensee or on-duty employee to be on or about the licensed premises while in an intoxicated or disorderly condition.

 

Michael Zenner - CEO      

Hospitality Checkpoint LLC

hospitalitycheckpoint.com

bartheft.com  (blog)

liquorassessment.com

PO BOX 995 Gilbert AZ 85299

Office: 480-777-1919

Toll Free: 800-880-0811

© Hospitality Checkpoint LLC 2015


New restaurants, closings in metro Phoenix in December

January 9, 2015 02:50 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

New restaurants, closings in metro Phoenix in December

More than a dozen restaurants opened in December, including Grabbagreen at CityScape in downtown Phoenix, Nori Sushi in Scottsdale, and Culinary Dropout at the Farmer Arts District in Tempe. Three places shut their doors, including Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville at Westgate Entertainment District in Glendale.

Now open

Grabbagreen

Build a salad or bowl from a long list of items such as quinoa noodles, salmon, tofu, kale, avocado, black beans and goji berries. Or order a signature dish like the 286-calorie Indochin grain bowl with rice noodles, chicken, cucumber, bean sprouts, carrot, green onion, cilantro and a spicy almond dressing. The newest branch at CityScape joins two in Scottsdale.

Details: CityScape, First and Washington streets in Phoenix. Other locations at grabbagreen.com.

Juby True

Set just west of 40th Street on Camelback Road in Phoenix, this Fox Restaurant Concepts juice bar serves organic, cold-pressed juices as well as coffee, tea, snacks, salads and super-food meal-replacement smoothies. There are also locations at Scottsdale Quarter and Biltmore Fashion Park at the center's True Food Kitchen location.

Details: 3912 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix. 480-240-1277, foxrc.com.

Bosa Donuts

Two more Bosa Donuts opened in December: one at Seventh Street and Union Hills Drive in Phoenix and another at Higley and Baseline roads in Gilbert. Apple fritters, sprinkle doughnuts, croissants, bagels, doughnut holes, bear claws, coffee, tea and smoothies are among the offerings.

Details: 710 E. Union Hills Drive, Phoenix. 623-388-6656. And 1614 N. Higley Road, Gilbert. 480-699-9962. Search "Bosa Donuts" on Facebook.

Toro Latin Restaurant & Rum Bar

This new restaurant within Fairmont Scottsdale Princess is a collaboration with celebrity chef Richard Sandoval, who also operates La Hacienda Mexican restaurant in the resort. It's housed in the old Grill golf clubhouse eatery overlooking the 18th green of the TPC Scottsdale Stadium Course. Menu highlights include a "suviche" bar (sushi and ceviche), wok dishes, small plates, grilled entrees and a spirits list of more than 100 rums, sugar-cane spirits and Latin wines.

Details: 17020 N. Hayden Road. 480-585-4848, scottsdaleprincess.com.

Nori Sushi

This Japanese restaurant near Bell Road and Thompson Peak Parkway has an extensive menu, with seafood choices ranging from tuna sashimi to baked miso Chilean sea bass. And there's chicken katsu and ribeye steak for the squeamish. There's another location at Desert Ridge Marketplace in north Phoenix.

Details: 10115 E. Bell Road, Scottsdale. 480-513-6488. And Desert Ridge Marketplace, Loop 101 and Tatum Boulevard, Phoenix. 480-515-9777, noriaz.com.

Dakota

Restaurant by day, club by night, Dakota is one of the newest additions to the Scottsdale entertainment district. The kitchen opens at 7 a.m. for breakfast and serves dinner until 10 p.m. Look for dishes such as the farmhouse egg panini, Chinese chicken salad, and cider-brined Amish pork chop. The bar is open until 2 a.m. A grab-and-go cafe with pastries, salads, sandwiches, beer and wine is open from 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

Details: 7301 E. Indian Plaza, Scottsdale. dakotabar.com.

Corner Bakery Cafe

Open from breakfast through dinner, this order-at-the-counter cafe serves egg scramblers, sandwich and soup lunch combos and entree-size pastas and pastry. The Scottsdale store is the third in Arizona for the Dallas-based chain, which boasts more than 180 company-owned and franchised locations, including one at the Arizona Center in downtown Phoenix and another near the Peoria Sports Complex.

Details: 15505 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale. 480-219-9022. Other locations at cornerbakerycafe.com.

Culinary Dropout at the Farmer Arts District

This gastropub opened at the Farmer Arts District development, a business cluster housed in what used to be a warehouse at First Street and Farmer Avenue near downtown Tempe. The project was Fox Restaurant Concepts' largest to date, and includes the company's biggest kitchen. Also at the complex is the Madison Improvement Club, a fitness club. Over Easy, a breakfast restaurant, is scheduled to join the party in early 2015.

Details: 149 W. Farmer Ave., Tempe. 480-240-1601. Other locations at culinarydropout.com.

Snooze, an A.M. Eatery

Located next to Postino in the remodeled ASU Art Annex Building in Tempe, this breakfast spot is Arizona's second. The first is opened in 2013 at the Shops at Town & Country, 20th Street and Camelback Road in Phoenix. The Colorado-based chain's from-scratch menu includes breakfast potpie smothered in rosemary sausage gravy; eggs Benedict topped with spicy barbacoa beef and cream-cheese hollandaise; and a list of breakfast cocktails.

Details: 615 S. College Ave., Tempe. 480-355-1934. And 2045 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix. 480-725-8000, snoozeeatery.com.

Tapacubo

The second restaurant at the recently opened Graduate Tempe hotel near the ASU campus, this Latino street-food kitchen is serving up chicharron (duck-fat-fried pork rinds), arepas, ancho-braised carnitas tacos, carne asada and fried-egg tortas and dulce de leche ice cream. The Normal Diner opened at the hotel, which took over the former Twin Palms Hotel, in October.

Details: 225 E. Apache Blvd., Tempe. 480-967-9431, tapacubotempe.com.

Boulders on Southern

This sister location to Boulders on Broadway in Tempe opened in the former R.T. O'Sullivan's space near Fiesta Mall in Mesa. The new spot has the same focus on well-executed bar bites, craft brews and bicycle culture as the original.

Details: 1010 W. Southern Ave., Mesa. 480-659-4816, bouldersonsouthern.com.

The Draft Sports Grill

TV screens and craft beer abound at this sports bar that took over the Buffalo Wild Wings space near Alma School Road and Southern Avenue by Fiesta Mall. Chicken wings, crab and artichoke dip, pulled-pork burgers, and fried chicken and waffles are among the many food offerings.

Details: 1130 W. Grove Ave., Mesa. 480-588-8988, draftgrill.com.

JC's Steakhouse

You'll find prime rib, Alaskan halibut, Australian lamb chops and Cornish game hen at this Gilbert steakhouse opened by Dennis Petty and Diana Blewer, who also operate the Groves Bar & Grill in Gilbert. Located at Gilbert and Ray roads in the former Cafe Posada space, the restaurant's name is a combination of the couple's fathers' first initials: John and Charles.

Details: 25 E. Ray Road, Gilbert. 480-306-4545, jcssteakhouse.com.

OPA Life Greek Cafe

The Mediterranean-inspired menu at this Westgate Entertainment District spot includes breakfast paninis, gyros, salads, appetizers and grilled-meat skewers. Look for pork souvlaki, feta-topped fries, Greek salmon salad and a sliced gyro cheeseburger. The original branch opened in July in the former My Big Fat Greek Express on Mill Avenue and Baseline Road in Tempe.

Details: Westgate Entertainment District, Loop 101 and Glendale Avenue in Glendale, 623-242-8338. And 227 E. Baseline Road, Tempe, 480-292-8180. opalifegreekcafe.com.

Now closed

Four Peaks Tasting Room on Wilson, is now closed to the public as a taproom. The Tempe-based brewery plans to reopen it as an events space.

Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville, casual dining restaurant with an island theme at Westgate Entertainment District in Glendale.

Chino Bandido, Mexican-Chinese fusion restaurant near Dobson road and Chandler boulevard in Chandler. The Phoenix location remains open.



http://azc.cc/1BdSkNo

 

Michael Zenner - CEO      

Hospitality Checkpoint LLC

hospitalitycheckpoint.com

bartheft.com  (blog)

liquorassessment.com

PO BOX 995 Gilbert AZ 85299

Office: 480-777-1919

Toll Free: 800-880-0811

© Hospitality Checkpoint LLC 2015


BARTENDER THEFT: Bartender adds double tip to bill. Credit Card Fraud.

December 4, 2014 22:09 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

BARTENDER THEFT:

Ohhhh lovely December. The season of thieving dishonest bartenders and restaurant servers comes to its peak. The amount of theft happening in the hospitality industry soars 400% late November and December. Friends, watch your credit card statements as bartenders and servers do this all the time when they feel pressured to make holiday money. Greedy jerks weren’t happy with a big 25% holiday tip and had to add another unauthorized 20% tip on top. Friggin’ thieves.

“Agent paid the bill with a credit card, left the slip blank except for Agent’s signature, and placed a $10 bill down with the credit receipt. On 12/3, Agent confirmed that the total charged was $48.61. Obviously, someone behind the bar had added an $8 tip on to the bill without authorization.

On 12/3, the POS transaction cleared Agent’s bank account. An unauthorized additional $8 tip had been added to the credit card charge by the bartenders. This also constitutes credit card fraud. These bartenders received a total of $18 in gratuity on a $40 bill. This is a blatant theft integrity issue that should be addressed immediately as one can interpolate that if they are stealing from a bar theft agent, then they most likely are doing it quite often with other guests.”

Michael Zenner - CEO      

Hospitality Checkpoint LLC

hospitalitycheckpoint.com

bartheft.com  (blog)

liquorassessment.com

PO BOX 995 Gilbert AZ 85299

Office: 480-777-1919

Toll Free: 800-880-0811

© Hospitality Checkpoint LLC 2014


HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

November 6, 2014 21:04 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

BARTENDER THEFT:

Bartender Summary

 

There were three bartenders that will be denoted as bartenders A, B, and C.  Bartender A was a female Caucasian with long blonde hair wearing a low cut Xxxxxxxxx tank.  Bartender B was a Caucasian male with a tall Mohawk haircut with blonde tips.  He was unshaven, but did not wear a beard.  Bartender C was a bulky Caucasian male with spiky blonde hair in somewhat of a faux-hawk style.

 

When this agent arrived in the bar, the rail was relatively full with a group of what appeared to be regular female patrons.  The first impression that this agent had of this bar was Bartender C taking Bacardi 151 directly from the service pour spout into his mouth and spewing fire behind the bar as he lit the 151 he was expelling from his mouth.  The violations, health infractions, and liabilities are numerous on this one initial impression.  This agent will leave it to the managers and owners of Xxxxxxxxx if they want to continue with this type of activity.  This agent would strongly recommend that this be discontinued immediately.

 

Bartender A was the first bartender to approach this agent on the bar top.  She mentioned the specials for the night and mentioned that Miller Light bottles were on sale for $2.  The agent opted to start the night with this.  This female bartender immediately rang the drink through the POS and the screen notated the $2 charge.  Change was returned immediately and there were no issues with this transaction.

 

At 1015pm the bar really began to fill up.  Multiple groups came in through the front doors and began to gather and order from the bar.  From 1015 until after 1115, this agent sat near where Bartender C was working.  This was the middle well. 

 

This agent counted 5 NO SALE deposits from drinks that were paid for in cash over this well.  The bartender would approach the terminal with the money, simply hit the NO SALE key, which would flash across the POS and deposit the money directly into his drawer.  This was so brazen that there wasn’t even an attempt to shadow the terminal or hide it. 

 

Literally, the only drinks that were actually run through the POS system were those drinks where a credit card transaction was needed.  Unfortunately on this night, this terminal was heavy on cash transactions and light on credit.  The bottom line is that if a report were run during the middle of this shift, Bartender C’s drawer would be found way over. 


In addition to this, Bartender C was also seen giving an unrung long neck over the bar with a thumbs up to a male patron, which is a violation of liquor ordinance concerning free alcohol as well as a bartender theft loss to the club.

 

TITLE 4, CHAPTER 3

4-242. Sale of liquor on credit prohibited; exceptions

It is unlawful for a licensee, or an employee or agent of a licensee, to sell or offer to sell, directly or indirectly, or to sanction the sale on credit of spirituous liquor, or to give, lend or advance money or anything of value for the purpose of purchasing or bartering for spirituous liquor, except that sales of spirituous liquor consumed on the licensed premises may be included on bills rendered to registered guests in hotels and motels, and spirituous liquor sales for on or off premises consumption may be made with credit cards approved by the director, and sales of spirituous liquor consumed on the premises of private clubs may be included on bills rendered to bona fide members.

 

Half way through this evaluation, the agent had to actually wave Bartender B down for another Miller Light Bottle.  This agent had been told that the special of the night was $2 Miller Bottles by Bartender A.  This agent paid with a $5 and was given $1 in change.  Consequently, Bartender A was waived down and asked if the special was off at that time or had expired.  She replied that it was all night.  The agent noted the deficit and she immediately opened the drawer and gave the agent money from the drawer.  This might sound like great customer service.  However, upon closer inspection it really lends itself to the unmistakable conclusion that she knew there was plenty of extra money in that drawer and in fact things like this happen continually and it was in no way out of the norm. 

 

To further exemplify bartender theft and integrity issues, this agent heard the price on this same bottle of beer quoted to other patrons at $2.50 and $3.00 respectively within a ten minute period.  This is strong evidence of buck boosting as well.

 

In terms of Bartender B, NO SALE deposits were also noted happening on his terminal, which was the far end nearest the kitchen.  This agent counted two of them on his drawer that were flagrant.  Bartender A was the only bartender on shift for the night that was not seen making NO SALE cash deposits into her drawer.  However, many of her drinks were seen coming in from cocktail servers, as she was working the terminal closest to the front door.

 

Showmanship appears to be something that the bartenders or the managers or both consider very important on this bar.  However, they as a group are not very good at it.  This agent witness long draw pours from free pour spouts where a good 1-2 count of liquor actually hit the floor.  Additionally, one group of three mixed vodka drinks actually drained half a bottle with this showmanship.  Bartender C was seen guzzling energy drinks one after another behind the bar in the well, and Bartender B was seen with a huge gallon of water that he was drinking from and storing near the ice well. 

 

Midshift bar drawer audits are an absolute necessity, along with the immediate replacement of all but Bartender A, and this agent believes that she is also complicit, knowing what is going on.  Thousands of dollars in combined sales and cost are being lost here.


Michael Zenner - CEO      

Hospitality Checkpoint LLC

hospitalitycheckpoint.com

bartheft.com  (blog)

liquorassessment.com

PO BOX 995 Gilbert AZ 85299

Office: 480-777-1919

Toll Free: 800-880-0811

© Hospitality Checkpoint LLC 2014


HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

November 6, 2014 20:45 by administrator

HOSPITALITY CHECKPOINT SPOTTER SERVICE

BARTENDER THEFT:

Bartender Summary

·       Bartender 1- Caucasian male, thin/athletic build, short, gelled/spiked dark hair, with a xxxxxxxxxxxx, wearing a black uniform t-shirt with a logo diamond on the front, and black shorts.  Working lower patio bar.

·       Bartender 2- Caucasian male, stocky/athletic build, with brown, gelled hair, and a thick mustache, wearing a black uniform t-shirt that read “I *heart symbol* *mustache*”, and khaki shorts.  Working lower patio bar.

·       Bartender 3- Caucasian male, athletic build, with short buzzed brown hair and a thick handlebar mustache, wearing a black, uniform, diamond logo t-shirt, and khaki shorts.  Working lower patio bar.

·       Bartender 4- Caucasian female, tiny, thin build, with long stringy brown hair, wearing a black uniform t-shirt.  Working top satellite patio bar. 

·       Bartender 5- Caucasian female, medium build, with dirty blonde, light brown, and blue hair, wearing a black uniform t-shirt.  Working lounge bar.

·       Bartender 6- Caucasian male, medium build, with short dark hair, a dark mustache, wearing a uniform t-shirt and black shorts.  Working the lounge bar.

 

When the agent and associate approached the bar located at the bottom of the patio bar the agent was quickly greeted by Bartender 1.  The agent placed a drink order with Bartender 1 as well as ordered two shots (Please see Food and Beverage Summary for details).  Bartender 1 quickly poured the beverage, garnishing the glass with his bare hands, and served the agent, then poured the two shots.

 

Bartender 1 asked the agent if he wanted to start a tab or pay cash and the agent closed the tab using his credit card.  Bartender 1 rang the beverages into the register, swiped the card, and provided the agent with a bill with accurate charges.

 

Bartender 1 did not serve the associate or the agent with a beverage napkin. 

 

Bartender 1 was noted to scoop the ice from the ice bin using his mixing tin and then guide the ice into the glassware by cupping the ice in his hand and letting it fall against his hand and into the glass.